Tidbits from Auburn Football

Posted by Jared Baker | 8:40 AM | 1 comments »

A few tidbits from the past week about Auburn's football team.

Sophomore running back Eric Smith was ruled academically ineligible for the Outback Bowl on January 1st. Smith who didn't see much time on the field ran the ball for 99 yards on 20 carries and caught 18 passes for 226 yards. This shouldn't affect Guz Malzahn's offensive game plan since Smith wasn't a major factor in the offense anyways.

Congratulations to 8 seniors that received their diplomas on Friday, they were wide receivers John Cubelic and Tim Hawthorne, holder Clayton Crofoot, defensive backs Zac Etheridge and Montae Pitss, offensive linemen Jeno James and Darrell Roseman, and linebacker Craig Stevens. This is what college sports is all about letting these young men get a free education while doing something they are physically gifted at.

Another congratulations needs to go out to Antonio Coleman and Ben Tate for being invited to the Senior Bowl, the game that showcases the seniors to NFL scouts.

Defensive end Antonio Coleman, a Mobile native led the SEC with 9 sacks and 15.5 tackles for loss. The All-SEC defensive end will be playing on Sundays next season with his size, strength and speed Coleman should be drafted fairly high in April's draft.

Running back Ben Tate ran for 1,254 yards this season that ranked 4th best in the SEC and 23rd nationally. Tate had 6 100-yard rushing games on the season and should get a chance to play for a team looking for a solid back-up. He is a very hard runner and excelled this season under new offensive coordinator Guz Malzahn.

These 2 young men deserve everything they received as well as the 8 young men that graduated this semester. We at Tigerssource.com are very proud of these accomplishments.

1 comments

  1. John // December 20, 2009 at 6:55 PM  

    Do you know who am I?
    Here is a hot news:
    After weeks of transforming its approach to concussions and its research into their long-term effects among players, the NFL Draft not only announced Sunday that it would support research by its most vocal critics but also conceded publicly for the first time that concussions can have lasting consequences.
    “It’s quite obvious from the medical research that’s been done that concussions can lead to long-term problems,” the league spokesman Greg Aiello said in a telephone interview. He was discussing how the league could donate $1 million or more to the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University, whose discoveries of brain damage commonly associated with boxers in the brains of deceased football players were regularly discredited by the NFL Draft